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Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

Building Better

We can save money and help solve global warming by reducing the amount of energy we use, and the best place to start is in the buildings we live and work in every day.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving: How Clean Cars Can Save Americans Money and Cut Oil Use

Our analysis found that, if the average car got 60 miles per gallon (mpg) instead of the current 26.4 mpg, Americans would save $234 million at the gas pump on Thanksgiving travel this year and cut gasoline consumption by 80 million gallons.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

The Carbon Boom

The early effects of global warming are already evident across the United States and worldwide. The past nine years have all been among the 25 warmest for the contiguous United States, a streak unprecedented in the historical record. If emissions are left unchecked, temperatures will continue to rise, and the effects of global warming will become more severe. This report examines trends in U.S. global warming pollution nationally and by state and concludes that the failure to limit emissions nationwide has allowed global warming pollution to grow out of control.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

Hotter Fields, Lower Yields: How Global Warming Could Hurt America's Farms

America’s reliance on fossil fuels – coal, oil, and natural gas – is fueling global warming and causing a host of other environmental, economic, and security problems. And while the impacts vary from region to region, global warming threatens all sectors of our economy, and agriculture is no exception.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

America's Biggest Polluters: Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Power Plants in 2007

The United States relies heavily on outdated technology and limited resources for most of its electricity needs. While the production of clean, renewable energy such as wind and solar power is growing, the vast majority of American electricity comes from burning fossil fuels—coal, oil, and natural gas—and from nuclear power.

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